Dody Johnson

About Me

Artie, Dody, Kathy and Mom behind the Wheel

   

        Writing is how I breathe and process life. I am using this art form to express my passion for a quality life. I wrote for myself as a young child and imagined a better place. I wrote in my journal everyday in my teen years and found comfort in my words. My background is from a dark place common to near a quarter of our population. Now, I write to advocate for three million US children living with violence in their homes. My writing and public speaking breaks the silence about child abuse and encourages its prevention. I hope to do for children who are afraid to go home, what animal activist have accomplished in preventing cruelty to animals.

 

       Growing up in my violent home I was fortunate that I repressed my bad memories and was able to disappear at times. I was unfortunate that confusion, distrust and extreme low self-esteem became my reality. At the age of forty-five those repressed memories started to surface. I immediately went into shock called shutdown mode and had to find help in order to function again. In therapy I was told if I did the hard work to heal, my life could be of better quality than of someone who was never abused and that became my goal. I wanted that quality life.

 

        Every year three million children are harmed in their homes.  Some will repress their bad memories and some will disappear into a fugue state as needed. Many of the children who are acting out in school showing violent behavior and bullying their classmates are being hurt themselves at home. Our jails are filled with adults who were tormented by their parents when they were young. We have men and women surviving with the aid of alcohol and drugs trying to hide from their childhood memories. We have Charles Manson and Ted Bundy.  We have wounded adults having babies without a clue how to love or care for them and the violent cycle continues.

 

        There is no cure for growing up in a violent home but there is life changing healing. At the age of fifty I started seeing me as the person I was meant to be. I felt proud. I saw how strong I was to survive my childhood horrors and I see how strong I am today for being able to face those same horrors.  I stopped being fearful of people.


        Today, there is no stopping me when I set out to accomplish a goal and I love the challenge.  After doing the hard work to heal, my life is of gold quality.

 

        The children who are not helped while living in their violent homes when they are still young will suffer a lifetime from their abuses. Some will suffer in jail later in life, others with alcohol or drugs, never finding peace.   And some who are lucky will repress their bad memories, disappear from life, begin healing at middle age and hopefully start living a quality life at fifty.

 

        By stopping the silence of child abuse and working towards its prevention, we offer a strong, healthy future for our little ones.